Sermons

Happy Are the Humble

The King’s new message was closely related to the message of the Old Testament and was a reaffirmation of it. Yet the emphasis of the gospel (“good news”) was radically different from the current understanding of the Old Testament—and Christ’s message struck violently against the Jewish tradition of His day.

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The Testing of the Son of God

We must see that the testing of Jesus had its place in God’s plan for his Son. The Spirit had just come on Jesus at the baptism, and that same Spirit now leads him to where the truth of that sonship would become clear through the process of resisting temptation.

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A Voice in the Desert

Matthew introduces John the Baptist as the exact fulfillment of prophecy, and he ties together the end of the Old Testament and the beginning of the New Testament. There had not been a prophet in Israel for four hundred years, since Malachi. But after four hundred silent years, the flow of God’s revelation starts again as Matthew picks up precisely where Malachi left off.

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Fulfillments and Fulfillment

Starting in 1:18 and ending in 2:23, Matthew gives us five fulfillments of what has been said through the prophets—1:22-23; 2:5-6, 15, 17-18, and 23. The first two are what I’ll call precise fulfillments; the latter three are patterned fulfillments.

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We Two Kings

I’m sorry to ruin what might be your favorite Christmas carol, but here in Matthew 2:1–12 there are not likely three kings. However, there are two! Matthew wants us to take note of two kings—King Herod and King Jesus.

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The Blood Covenant

No scene is more dramatic than the one described in Exodus 24, in which God confirms his covenant with Israel. The covenant denoted a sacred relationship, established by God, in which God belongs to his people and his people belong to him.

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The Melody of Matthew

The four Gospels—Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John—all sound the same. Yet each Gospel has a distinct melody of its own. And just as we can recognize the melody of “Ode to Joy” each time we hear the first four notes, so can we recognize Matthew’s melody if we hear the recurring themes.

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